Category Archives: fun facts

Lit Chat 4

I’ve been slacking on my Lit Chat posts. Apparently once a week is too much for me. So maybe the prompts will last two years instead of one! 🙂

What book would you love to see as a movie or TV series? Pick your dream cast.

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The Night Circus. I absolutely want The Night Circus to be a movie. Immediately. Or a TV series. I don’t care which. The movie rights were bought in 2011 by Summit Entertainment so it is possible, but it’s been over 7 years so… It is SO magical and there are so many scenes that are begging to be visualized on the screen. The tents alone could have their own episodes. I’m not so good with celebrities, I don’t watch many movies actually, so I can’t say who should be cast.

I could have also picked Discovery of Witches but that IS becoming a TV show. In fact, the wrapped this week I think. Here’s a quick 20 second trailer.

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Lit Chat 3

Do you have a favorite book from childhood? Have you read it as an adult? Was it just as good?

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I don’t know if this was my favorite book but it was so meaningful to me. I talked about it two years ago when I posted about why you should read aloud to kids at any and all ages. My dad read Johnny Tremain to me when I was little. I’m pretty sure I didn’t have a sibling at the time which means I was under 8 years old. I re-read it in college some time and then wrote about the experience for my grad school essay but haven’t since then. I meant to read it last year for a reading challenge prompt (a book you loved as a child) but I never got around to it. I should definitely pick it up again to see if it’s just as enthralling. Some part of me thinks it won’t be and that it was the experience of being read to that I enjoyed the most.

Do you have a favorite book from childhood?

These questions came from the Lit Chat deck of cards.

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Lit Chat 2

tbr

Do you have a TBR pile? How do you keep track of your reading queue? Name 3 books on your list.

Of course I have a TBR pile. What a silly question. My whole house is a TBR pile. The picture above are books I checked out from the library to read and the top shelf is all my Book of the Month books, most of them unread. That picture is actually from November 2017 and I read none of those books. I often take out way more than I can handle and end up reading two good ones before they’re all due back. I still have Lilli De Jong at my house and I actually have my own copy of Invisible Furies now (I had lent my BOTM copy to a friend). I don’t really keep track of my reading queue. I rarely ever mark things as to-read in my Goodreads account. I just checked, the last time I added something was August 23, 2017. I feel like if I added everything I wanted to-read it would become overwhelming. There’s no need. There will always be something I want to read, I don’t need a list to remind me.

3 books on my list – other than the two I just listed up there

  1. Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk (I’ve heard it might win the Newbery)
  2. How to Stop Time by Matt Haig (released Feb 6 – saw it in my Real Simple magazine and has been compared to Time Traveler’s Wife)
  3. Scythe by Neal Shusterman (recommended to me on Goodreads by a friend and was on the Audible sale this week)

These questions came from the Lit Chat deck of cards.

 

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Truth

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March 27, 2017 · 7:48 am

Give them books – not Google

Original article published at Wired.com on March 8, 2017

When Your Kid Asks a Question, Hand Them a Book—Not a Phone

When my 5-year-old asks a question, is there a difference between looking it up in a book and just using my phone?

Recently, I watched David Kwong do some sleight of hand in a crowded theater lobby. Kwong is a magician who often consults on Hollywood films. (When a director needs, say, Jesse Eisenberg to learn a magic trick, they send him to Kwong.) Anyway, Kwong sauntered over to a guy with a deck of cards and asked him to pick one.

Honestly, I don’t know how to describe what happened next. For 30 minutes, Kwong made cards materialize in outrageous, stupefying ways, as though he were nonchalantly sliding them in and out of a parallel universe. Someone’s card flew out of the deck, spinning through the air. Another turned up in a guy’s back pocket—and not just in his back pocket, but buried deep, between his wallet and a bundle of crumpled receipts. Kwong asked someone to rip a card into four pieces, then hold them in his fist; when he opened his hand, the card was reassembled!

Maybe this doesn’t sound that impressive, written down. We all know card tricks are a thing. But the way Kwong kept relentlessly confronting us with the impossible—seeing this sorcery at close range—seemed to not just entertain people but to make them feel vulnerable and a little scared. People mewled and screamed, “No!” One poor man was reduced to crouching on the floor, laughing so euphorically he couldn’t catch his breath. (OK, that was me.) The guy with the ripped-up card in his fist refused to open it at first, shaking his head like a child terrified to look at his boo-boo, afraid of what he’d find. “He has total power over us,” one woman said quietly, gravely. She sounded creeped out. It was so much fun!

Now, I’m sure everyone in that crowd wondered how Kwong was doing it, but it’s a rare bird who goes home and actually labors to understand the mechanics of how such tricks are engineered. (Those rare birds become magicians—it’s how Kwong got his start.) Most of us perceive magic tricks to be unreplicable, to violate the reality we inhabit. They’re, you know, magic.

To a 5-year-old, phones are magic. The internet is magic. An older kid might be able to understand the technology and infrastructure involved, the nature of Wikipedia, and so on, but for a child so young, the answer just appears, miraculously, like a playing card yanked from a bystander’s back pocket. Leafing through a book together, by comparison, is a more collaborative, tactile, self-evident process. It’s a journey toward the answer, one that your child gets to go on.

What I’m talking about is the difference between learning and being told, between answering a specific question and getting a child excited about answering it on their own. It’s fun to amaze your 5-year-old, sure. But it’s more gratifying to set your kid up to one day amaze you.

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Help! My kid hates reading!

These are four words I never want to utter. I don’t have kids and I don’t plan on it either but if I did I would never want to have a kid who hated reading. Can you imagine? A librarian who has a child who doesn’t like books? It’s probably inevitable now that I’ve said it out loud. If it ever does happen I will take comfort in this list of 10 tips for parents who have children who hate to read. Read the link for suggestions on how to implement beyond the tip.

  1. Establish a reading routine.
  2. Establish a library routine (yes, please!)
  3. Forget about progress.
  4. Withhold judgement. This one is so important!
  5. Try nonfiction.
  6. Set an example. Also, so important!
  7. Read aloud. Check out this other article about why reading aloud to older kids is so important.
  8. Read to discuss.
  9. Try audio books.
  10. Create a positive reading environment. My father-in-law has a dedicated reading room, and chair, in his house. It’s as if he physically can’t read anywhere other than there.

There are lots of other lists like this also.

10 steps to raising a lifelong reader

How to keep kids reading during the summer

8 ways to DIScourage reading! Don’t do these things!

Lastly, tips to foster great readers.

 

 

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Boss Baby Trailer

Don’t know how I missed this.

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